August JMAM opening a delight for the senses
by Alan Reed
Aug 09, 2006 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Versailles fiber artist Mary Lamb Nehring stands in front of several pieces she created for the Janice Mason opening. Nehring dyes all of her own cloth.
Versailles fiber artist Mary Lamb Nehring stands in front of several pieces she created for the Janice Mason opening. Nehring dyes all of her own cloth.
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Dan Neil Barnes of Lexington stands next to “Distorted Blue,” a glass sculpture he created specifically for the new exhibit.
Dan Neil Barnes of Lexington stands next to “Distorted Blue,” a glass sculpture he created specifically for the new exhibit.
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August 4 brought the opening for two artists’ works at the Janice Mason Art Museum. Textile artist Mary Nehring and glass artist Dan Barnes were in attendance explaining their works to visitors at the museum.

Museum president Jean Martin discussed the two Lexington-area artists. “Mary comes from a background as a traditional quilter, while Dan works with glass. He had just finished one of his pieces and the paint was wet when it arrived.”

The event featured refreshments, an opportunity to meet the artists and live music.

Jenny Howard, who was visiting the museum during the opening, enjoyed the two clarinetists. “I think it added to the ambiance of the evening, and they were from MSU, which is neat.”

Barnes discussed his newest piece, called “Distorted Blue.” The sculpture combines over 1,200 flat pieces of glass in a frame. “This is my first one in a frame. I have other ideas for variations of it. Everything I do opens the door for something new,” he said.

Clark Tingle was one of several visitors at the gallery at the opening. He said, “When I look at art, I look at the craftsmanship needed to create the pieces. An artist has to develop the skills needed to be creative. Obviously he has the skills to do this kind of work. I like (Distorted Blue) because of the three-dimensional aspect of it. The limiting factor in glass is the flatness of it, so he has added another dynamic to the medium.”

Museum Board Secretary Paul Fourshee noted that the two artists’ works compliment each other well. “They work together a lot, but don’t really plan to exhibit together. The colors and textures are put together well between several pieces. The textures on these hangings create motion between the pieces.”

For the rest of this story, read this week's Cadiz Record.
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