Puppets and books equal summer entertainment
by Hawkins Teague
Jul 19, 2006 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Although the children at the summer reading program weren’t enticed by the prospect of having a snake, a skunk or an orangatan as a pet, they were all unanimous on the black Labrador. The morning session was for kids age two to six.
Although the children at the summer reading program weren’t enticed by the prospect of having a snake, a skunk or an orangatan as a pet, they were all unanimous on the black Labrador. The morning session was for kids age two to six.
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Diane Licholat-Surati and her three-year-old son, Zachary, play with a black Labrador puppet that was used for the puppet show in the kids’ summer reading program. “Paws, Claws, Scales and Tales” continues today and concludes on July 26 with a visit from Jami Carroll of Land Between the Lakes’ Nature Station.
Diane Licholat-Surati and her three-year-old son, Zachary, play with a black Labrador puppet that was used for the puppet show in the kids’ summer reading program. “Paws, Claws, Scales and Tales” continues today and concludes on July 26 with a visit from Jami Carroll of Land Between the Lakes’ Nature Station.
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The children’s summer reading program continued last week at the John L. Street Library with a puppet show featuring animals telling kids why they would or wouldn’t make good pets.

Various animals lectured the kids, including a skunk, a black Labrador, a snake, a groundhog and an orangutan. Although the children in the morning session, who ranged in ages two to six, seemed a bit restless, they reacted enthusiastically when the dog asked them if they would like him as a pet.

As if they had preparing for the moment, most of them shouted, “Yes!”

Hilary Pate, 17, helped perform the puppet show. She wasn’t aware she would be helping with the program until her friend, library employee Amanda Rogers, called her that morning and woke her up with the request. She said she probably wouldn’t be doing it again, but that she had a lot of fun doing that morning.

Several of the kids stuck around later than others and seemed to enjoy playing with the puppets much more than watching them. One of them was three-year-old Zachary Licholat-Surati, whose mother, Diane, seemed to have as much fun playing with him. She said it programs like this were important not only because they encouraged kids to read, but because it gave small children access to others their age.

For the rest of this story, read this week's Cadiz Record.
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