Quilter’s Guild prepares for spotlight
by Hawkins Teague
Jul 26, 2006 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Eight quilts made by 10 members of the Trigg County Quilter’s Guild were chosen by the American Quilter’s Society in Paducah to be judged at the Nashville Quilt Exposition in August. (From left, standing) Tish Rudd, Betty Cardwell, Pat McManamay, Lorraine Lundquist, Marilyn Reibel, Nancy O’Brien and Pam Goeltz. (Seated) Shirley Wilson, president of TCQG, Sam Tucker and Wilma Sullivan.
Eight quilts made by 10 members of the Trigg County Quilter’s Guild were chosen by the American Quilter’s Society in Paducah to be judged at the Nashville Quilt Exposition in August. (From left, standing) Tish Rudd, Betty Cardwell, Pat McManamay, Lorraine Lundquist, Marilyn Reibel, Nancy O’Brien and Pam Goeltz. (Seated) Shirley Wilson, president of TCQG, Sam Tucker and Wilma Sullivan.
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When Sam Tucker of the Trigg County Quilter’s Guild came home from vacation on July 3, he expected to find boxes full of quilts sent back to him from Paducah, where they had been sent to the American Quilter’s Society to be judged. Instead of a box, Tucker was greeted by an e-mail informing him that the quilts had been judged worthy of further consideration in the Ultimate Guild Challenge category at the Nashville Quilt Exposition in August.

Tish Rudd was one of the first people Tucker called. Rudd said that she could hear the emotion and shakiness in his voice when she picked up the phone, and thought that one of their former members had died. Luckily, she was wrong.

The eight wall quilts, which were made by 10 guild members, including Tucker, were initially displayed at October’s Trigg County Country Ham Festival, where the guild holds their annual show. Every year the guild challenges its members to create quilts within specific size limitations and based upon a chosen theme to show off at the festival. Outside judges award prizes to the ones they think are the best, and the guild sends them to Paducah the following spring. The 2005 show’s theme was “We Dig the Pig.”

It may be hard to explain the appeal of quilting to a casual observer, but it’s clear upon meeting the guild members just how much the activity means to them.

Marilyn Reibel said she gets a deep satisfaction from putting so many different fabrics and patterns together to create something new. Betty Cardwell said that when she was young, her mother’s quilting fascinated her. Her mother handed her spool and a pack of needles and told her that her job was to thread the needles.

Out of the 10 members whose work will be displayed in Nashville, four live in Lyon County, which doesn’t have a similar club. When Nancy O’Brien moved to Eddyville from Bloomington, Ind., she met Reibel, who was wearing an outfit that had something to do with quilting. O’Brien complimented her and told she would like to take up quilting in her retirement. Before she knew it, Reibel was telling her she’d pick her up in the morning because she knew right where to take her.

“Home Sweet Hamlet,” which won first place in the Trigg County contest, is the work of O’Brien, Reibel and Pat McManamay, who lives in Kuttawa. The quilt may be the most elaborate design and features many Kentucky icons such as a tobacco barn and cardinals. And pigs, of course.

For the rest of this story, read this week's Cadiz Record.
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