Genesis teaches joy of reading, hazards of drugs
by Hawkins Teague
Jul 26, 2006 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dave Baxter (far right), coordinator for the local branch of the Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy, presents the Genesis Express Activity Center with a ceremonial check for more than $7,000. Also pictured: Genesis president Jerry Wilson (left) and Bobby Acree.
Dave Baxter (far right), coordinator for the local branch of the Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy, presents the Genesis Express Activity Center with a ceremonial check for more than $7,000. Also pictured: Genesis president Jerry Wilson (left) and Bobby Acree.
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Paulette Anderson looks over Malik Cunningham’s shoulder as he reads aloud about Mexico. Cunningham lives in Louisville, but this was his second time at the Genesis Express’ summer reading program. On the left is Kellniqua Acree.
Paulette Anderson looks over Malik Cunningham’s shoulder as he reads aloud about Mexico. Cunningham lives in Louisville, but this was his second time at the Genesis Express’ summer reading program. On the left is Kellniqua Acree.
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The Genesis Express Activity Center not only wrapped up its summer reading program last week, but also received a grant of $7,823.14 from the Kentucky Agency for Substance Abuse Policy.

The money was awarded by the local board of KY-ASAP, which is known as the Black Patch Council. The board serves Trigg, Caldwell, Livingston, and Lyon counties. Dave Baxter, coordinator of the board, presented Genesis Express president Jerry Wilson with a giant ceremonial check last Wednesday afternoon.

Baxter said this is the second KY-ASAP grant given to Genesis, the first being in fall 2004. Although Genesis doesn’t offer a direct prevention program for alcohol, drugs and tobacco, he said that kids participating in their regular after-school programs are less likely to become involved in substance abuse. Just being in the positive environment is good for them, and Genesis has a good record of success with its kids, he said. Wilson said that the money would go mostly to Genesis’ summer reading and after-school programs.

Despite the absence of specific substance abuse prevention messages, much of Genesis’ programs go to that end. Genesis Express founder George Radford said that helps set it apart from other summer reading programs. Wilson said they have had speakers from the Pennyroyal Center talk about guns and alcohol, as well as athletes from the high school speaking to kids on similar topics at their after-school program.

This was even true at the summer reading program last week, which has been going on for more than 10 years, Radford said. The program lasted from 9 to 11 a.m., and different volunteers gave talks on drugs, alcohol or cigarettes every day while the children ate lunch. Last Wednesday, Barb Heneisen told kids about the dangers of smoking marijuana.

Heneisen listed a few ways that would allow kids to recognize if someone were high on marijuana. She said that person might have trouble focusing, that they might have short-term memory loss and that their pupils would be dilated. She also said that marijuana causes a lack of motivation and that employers lose money every year because of drug-related lowered productivity.

For the rest of this story, read this week's Cadiz Record.
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