Quilters provide latest JMAM exhibit
by Alan Reed
Mar 28, 2007 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This Thick-and-Thin Log Cabin Quilt by Betty McVey is a part of the new Trigg County Quilts Exhibit at the Janice Mason Art Museum.  The use of props like beds, rocking chairs and baby cribs gives the exhibit an organic and natural feel.
This Thick-and-Thin Log Cabin Quilt by Betty McVey is a part of the new Trigg County Quilts Exhibit at the Janice Mason Art Museum. The use of props like beds, rocking chairs and baby cribs gives the exhibit an organic and natural feel.
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The newest exhibit at the Janice Mason Art Museum shows just how folk art can transcend boundaries into fine art. With a variety of classic and innovative techniques, quilts made by the Trigg County Quilting guild move from the tops of beds to the walls of the Museum.

According to guild president Bobbie Musick, about 40 quilts grace the walls of the museum in an exhibit that opened last Friday and will run until April 22.

Guild Member Robin Vidrick said that most quilts exhibited were made by individual members of the group, except for one sewn by the guild. She said that the group quilt was the prize raffled at last year’s County Ham Festival.

“A lot goes into making a quilt. Some people start with a fabric that they find that they can’t live without. Others see a pattern or another quilt that influences their design. There is no right or wrong way to do a quilt,” said Musick.

“Once a fabric or pattern has been chosen, the quilter sets to work on making it,” added Vidrick.

At the entrance to the gallery, Musick discusses a quilt entitled “Beyond the Color Purple.” She demonstrates the artistry involved in the intricate design by examining the back of the quilt.

Inside the gallery, she explains the concept of a challenge quilt. “We have a theme, and this year’s was ‘Down the Garden Path,’ so everything relates to the garden. We have one piece of fabric we have to use, but can use as much or as little as we want. “

One particular piece in the Challenge Quilt Collection tickles Musick’s fancy. “This one came from three ladies from Eddyville, and you can tell who they are. They even have their dog in there,” she said with a smile. Pat McManamay, Marilyn Reibel and Nancy O’Brien can be seen in the quilt seated on a park bench as they survey a garden lane.

For the rest of this story, read this week's Cadiz Record.
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