Food Service Association teams with Helping Hands
by Alan Reed
Apr 16, 2008 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Members of the Trigg County Schools Food Service Association and Faria P’Pool’s food classes busily pack boxes with non-perishable goods to donate to the Helping Hands Food Bank. Helping Hands Co-Fonder K.G. Ariagno said that even with full shelves, the overwhelming need within the community can leave the pantry looking bare in a few days.
Members of the Trigg County Schools Food Service Association and Faria P’Pool’s food classes busily pack boxes with non-perishable goods to donate to the Helping Hands Food Bank. Helping Hands Co-Fonder K.G. Ariagno said that even with full shelves, the overwhelming need within the community can leave the pantry looking bare in a few days.
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Members of the Trigg County Schools Food Service Association combined their efforts with Faria P’Pool’s food classes to conduct a food drive for the Helping Hands Food Bank.

Paula Maddox of the Food Service Association said that she had not weighed the food but that it filled the bed of one of the district’s utility pickup trucks. “It’s something we do every year between students and food service workers in the district. Students from K to 12th grade is involved.”

P’Pool added, “We collected for the summer food drive, because it seems that lower income families depend on school to provide breakfast and lunch for their children. We collected items kids might like, including macaroni and cheese, Pop Tarts, ravioli and other items. The entire district contributed the food but members of my class helped to collect it.”

Even with another truckload of food coming to the Helping Hands pantry, Co-founder K.G. Ariagno said that her organization needs more contributions from the community. “Last month we had the most requests ever for food, with 144 families. We average about 130-133 per month. I only see the situation getting worse. It’s not going to change for a long time.”

Ariagno said that the food bank distributes food three days a week. Even when the shelves appear full, the end of the week reveals great demand through empty shelves.

Successful with the school food drive, which Ariagno called a “pretty goodly amount” as she thanked the students and Food Service Association, and in other recent events she called upon the community to continue to provide for needy residents. “We’re asking any club, group or organization to collect food or donate money for us to buy food.”

Ariagno said that a recent quilt show brought nearly $900 to Helping Hands, to purchase food to be given away to those satisfying criteria for a need in their families. “We though it was going to be a fun raiser, but it turned into a fund raiser as well. I am shocked how people continue to show their support.”

For the rest of this story, read this week's Cadiz Record.
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