University of Kentucky researchers studying environmental impacts of lawns
by Katie Pratt, UK Ag Communications
Aug 27, 2014 | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<i>Katie Pratt/UK Ag Communications<p>
UK doctoral student Kenneth Cropper takes measurements in one of the lawn management systems at UK Spindletop Research Farm.</i>
Katie Pratt/UK Ag Communications

UK doctoral student Kenneth Cropper takes measurements in one of the lawn management systems at UK Spindletop Research Farm.

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Many homeowners love the sight of a pristine, green lawn, but that beautiful, meticulously kept lawn may come at a cost to the environment. University of Kentucky scientists are conducting research to find the answer.

UK turfgrass doctoral student Kenneth Cropper and David Williams, UK turfgrass professor, are measuring the carbon emissions and inputs of four different lawn management styles. Two systems are comprised of Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue managed by a professional lawn care company. These sites are irrigated, fertilized and have pesticides applied.

The third trial consists of zoysiagrass, a low-maintenance, warm-season grass that is a common lawn grass farther south but hardy enough for Kentucky. The fourth is a low-maintenance plot with a mixture of grasses and plants commonly found in residential lawns in Kentucky.

For the rest of this story, see this week's issue of The Cadiz Record or subscribe to our e-Edition by calling 270-522-6605.
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